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March Spotlight: Laurie LeBreton

March 1, 2018

 

 

 

 

 

Laurie LeBreton lives in Chicago, Illinois and has been an OPAL Artist Member for 2 years. Laurie has been creating art for as long as she can remember and works with handmade paper, textiles and found materials.

 

Share a little about yourself, your ideas, and process. How did you approach your work? What motivates you as an artist? Are your passions or interests reflected in your work? 

 

"To Honor and Comfort" is new work that I showed recently at Essentia, in Chicago. The title comes from a beautiful book about Native American quilting traditions. The quilters in this book had a higher purpose even as they made useful objects. My friends who make cloth quilts also have strong motivations, making quilts to show their love and concern. My paper adaptations of the quilt form do the same. They also show my reverence for women’s crafts. My primary motivation as an artist is to understand what it means to be human. Each of these works is a kind of meditation, a kind of prayer. Some of them reach out to a greater power (“Worshipping with Red,” “Instructions for a Ritual,” “Homage to the Goddess”). With others I keep in mind a particular person (“Solace for Pablo”) or remember a particular time (“Sayulita” and “Beverly Shores”). The sculptures in “To Honor and Comfort” also reflect an on-going preoccupation, making a three dimensional object out of a flat surface. Each sculpture can be installed in a number of different ways, like a tapestry, reflecting my understanding of the impermanence of this world. Finally, they show my pleasure in repeating forms and processes and, I hope, the calm that comes with doing so. The sculptures in “To Honor and Comfort” are constructed primarily of handmade paper. Paper is light and appears fragile. As a paper sculptor, I know that it is also pliable, absorbs color beautifully, and is very strong. Abaca, the fiber I use most often, shrinks as it dries, adding the element of chance to all my work. I also love the process of papermaking because of my love of water, for its beauty, sensuality and for its healing qualities.

 

Share a little about yourself, your ideas, and process. How did you approach your work? What motivates you as an artist? Are your passions or interests reflected in your work? 


I'm quite serious when I say that I think with my hands. I begin a project by experimenting with materials and processes. As I do this, I look at the work of artists with similar interests. My range is wide. I look at established artists, outsider artists and craftspeople. Eventually I make a prototype that I'm pleased with, and I move on from there. I often work in multiples, creating many variations on a theme.

 


Discover more on Laurie's website: laurielebreton.net

 

 

Please click on the images for a slideshow gallery view with titles

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

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